Archive for the ‘Expedition Doctor’ Category

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Focus on Psych Jobs Downunder

Edinburgh based medical recruitment specialists Head Medical have a number of psychiatry roles in Australia.HeadMedical5

We’ve listed the vacancies on our jobs page, HERE, but to give you a flavour of what they have available, they include:

Head Medical are the UK’s leading international medical recruitment specialist. They recruit Doctors for fantastic positions in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and the Gulf.  They also recruit for jobs in the UK and are committed to turning your career ideas and goals into reality with the right job in the right location.

Find medical jobs in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Gulf Region, Canada and UK through Head Medical

Meet Head Medical at the World Extreme Medicine conference in Edinburgh at the World Extreme Medicine Conference, 18 – 21 November.

 

 

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Calling all sea-loving adventurous medics.

Windfall films are looking for sea-loving medical professionals CH4 Pacific Challengeto take part in a series for Channel 4. You’ll retrace a famous naval adventure across the Pacific Ocean in a replica sail boat, with only basic rations to keep you going.

For more information click on the picture and contact Windfall Films directly.

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Team Rubicon: Short term position in Nepal

TeamRubiconLogoOur lovely friends at Team Rubicon urgently require a volunteer medic to join them in Nepal, 19 March – 2 April.  Flights & expenses covered.  Please email a brief introduction and medical CV to tim.edwards@teamrubiconuk.org .  Here’s the detail:

Calling all medics! There is a fantastic opportunity to be part of a volunteer team going to Nepal in March to rebuild a school destroyed in the earthquake. Team Rubicon UK provides disaster relief to those affected by natural disasters, be they domestic or international. By pairing the skills and experiences of military veterans with first responders, medical professionals, and technology solutions, Team Rubicon aims to provide the greatest service and impact possible.

After last year’s earthquake Team Rubicon sent teams into Nepal to help with the immediate aftermath and hundreds of thousands of people were helped. Almost a year on there are still thousands of Nepalis who still need help with basic services. The team is complete except for one important member – a medic. Due to the remote nature of the deployment it is vital that they take someone suitably qualified to deal with trauma, life support, and normal medical problems. The team is 16 strong with basic first aid qualifications but what they really need is a paramedic or other suitably qualified person to deploy with them.

Team RubiconThe trip is from the 19 March until 2 April (flights dependent within a day). The deployment is unpaid but all flights and expenses are covered.If you are interested in being involved in what will be a fantastic opportunity please email a brief introduction and medical CV to tim.edwards@teamrubiconuk.org .

As time is short Team Rubicon have asked that only those who are confident that they can deploy get in contact.  Thanks.

 

Related courses
Mountain Medicine

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The latest news, views and opportunities from EWM Towers

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

To take advantage of the World Extreme Medicine Expo early bird offer use discount code WEMEEARLYBIRD30 at the checkout.

Response to the Paris attacks

The medical response to multisite terrorist attacks in Paris reviews the coordinated effort from the emergency services and Assistance
Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP) .
The article offers the perspective of an Emergency Physician, Anaesthesiologist and a Trauma Surgeon, before offering a conclusion.

It’s clear no matter what the plan, it’s the people; doctors, nurses, emergency services, administrators, volunteers and many others, that enable a successful response.
View the FULL ARTICLE on the Lancet’s website.

Jobs and opportunities

The European Space Agency is once again looking for a doctor to join them for a year of research and experiments at the Concordia research station in Antarctica.
Click HERE to see the post on the ESA website.

Luangwa Safari Association Medical Fund need a doctor for 3-6 months to provide care for staff and guest in addition to providing care at Kakumbi Rural Health Centre.
Check out the full details HERE and to read a previous doctor’s blog written during her time in the role click HERE

Course pick

Mountain Medicine 2016 following another extremely successful course in Nepal trekking to Kala Patthar and Everest Base Camp.
The first piece of feedback we received told us “this was the most amazing trip I have been on” and it is comments like these we aim for and pride ourselves on.
Pre-hospital Trauma Workshops will continue throughout 2016. We focus on initial care around head injuries, chest injuries, traumatic cardiac arrest, blast and ballistic injuries. We’ll also touch on crew resource management and effective leadership on scene in the single and multi casualty scenarios.

“We treat athletes like NASA treats astronauts”.

Last month saw the launch of Vollebak, a new brand that aims to tackle the fundamental issues faced by extreme sports people.

Having lived through the highs and lows that come with racing and training in the world’s toughest environments, founders and adventure athletes Steve and Nick Tidball, started working on products and experiments to help athletes relax and survive.
Click HERE to find out more.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

World Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo

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Expedition & Wilderness Medicine and Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo.

Have you used ‘WEMEEXPO15SPECIAL30’ ? There’s only 8 days left to take advantage of this massive 30% off the Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo tickets. Full Ts&CsHERE

Dive Medicine – Raja Ampat

Only 1 space remaining!
From September 21, we’ll be spending 11 days exploring the under water paradise of Raja Ampat. Home to over 1,050 divers fish species, 537 coral species and 6999 mollusc species, this stunning location is considered by many divers to have the richest composition of sea life anywhere in the world.
During this exciting expedition you’ll be staying on the liveaboard Shakti, taking part in up to three dives per day, with up to two hours of CME per day – leaving you plenty of time to enjoy your surroundings and share experiences with your fellow delegates and faculty.
If you’d like to snap up the last space email us HERE and we’ll hold the space for the first person to get in touch.
For more information on this trip clickHERE.

Polar Medicine – New Zealand

In a little over two weeks we’ll be enjoying the snowy wonders of the Southern Alps, and we now have capacity for a couple more delegates to join us.
Our highly experienced team will develop your specialist skills with practical sessions giving you hands on experience of rescuing and treating cold water immersion, frostbite, altitude related illnesses and hypothermia. Essential cold weather skills such as building shelters, snowshoeing and dog sledding will all be included.
If you’re thinking of applying your medical skills in a cold environment, you can’t go wring by starting here.
For more information on Polar Medicine click HERE.
If you’d like further information on our Polar and Mountain courses the check out THIS LINK.

Kili’ medic opportunity

Action Challenge are looking for a medic to join their Kilimanjaro expedition June 30 – August 09 2015. The expedition will be following the Machame route. The medic must be a fully qualified doctor – altitudue experience and expedition medicine course attendance preferred but not essential. Expenses for the trip will be covered.
Contact James Holland +44 (0)20 7609 6695 for more info.

Conference news

Keep your eyes peeled for a special newsletter this weekend with conference announcements that you just wont want to miss!

Poster Competition Liaison

James Yates works for the Great Western Air Ambulance as a Critical Care Paramedic. James has worked nationally and internationally, as a clinician and educator, as well as spending time with HART and UK-Med.
After completing an Expedition & Wilderness Medicine course, James has worked on various events across the world and we’re please he can now use his skills to assist us.
To entre our poster competition for the Extreme Medicine Conference email usHERE

 

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Medic opportunity for two Kilimanjaro trips

The role:New AC Logo resize
URGENT! Action Challenge is looking for expedition doctors to join us on their international challenges in Kilimanjaro!

Where:
International expeditions in Kilimanjaro

Dates:
7 day Machame: 30/07/15 – 09/08/15
Open Kili Lemosho August A: 20/08/15 – 30/08/15

Description of the trip:

– 7 day Machame: 30/07/15 – 09/08/15

For more information please see: http://www.kilimanjarochallenge.com/routedetail.php?ID=9

– Open Kili Lemosho August A: 20/08/15 – 30/08/15

For more information please see: http://www.kilimanjarochallenge.com/routedetail.php?ID=10

Experience and Level of training required:
Fully qualified Doctor of medicine – Altitude experience and courses in expedition medicine are preferred requirements bur not essential
Great interpersonal skills and a positive attitude are essential!

Contact details email & phone:
02076096695
James Holland – Resourcing Executive

Company biography
Action Challenge organises high quality challenges, trips and adventures for individuals to join our groups, and bespoke events for charities, companies, private groups & schools. What makes all our challenges truly unique is the way we encourage our groups to bond together as teams – and take on the challenge in front of them! As the saying goes, it’s through adversity that people come together; and in addition to the natural camaraderie that comes with a shared adventure, we actively involve people in the way the challenge unfolds. We believe that through great organisation and a good relationship with our clients, the more we are out of the limelight; the more members of the group get to shine.

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Short term medic opportunity – Doctor required in Central America 18th April – 19th May

Gapforce require a motivated medic to support their expedition medicine course starting 18th April.gapFORCElogo

You will be responsible for:

  •  Providing Medical support to all members of Gapforce expeditions.
  •  Monitor and safeguard the general health and hygiene of their expedition group
  •  Provide immediate emergency medical care to participants and staff
  •  Teach basic medical lessons

You need to:

  • Be an F2 doctor (minimum)
  • Have experience in Expedition Medicine

In return you will receive:

  •  Meals
  •  Accommodation
  •  A travel bursary (varies depending on the length of your availability)

 

Contact Lauren Nethercot

laurennethercot@gapforce.org

0207 384 3028

 

Links

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

Sir Ranulph Fiennes

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White Mars: Doctoring in the Coldest Place on Earth

Extreme medicine and expedition doctor Alexander Kumar provides an account of his time spent working in one of  the coldest places in Antarctica and one of the few true extreme environments on Planet Earth.  Known for his sense of humour, he has lived, worked and travelled through over 80 countries all over the world, including the Amazon and extensively across the Arctic and the Antarctic a few times also over the past 10 years

Alex Kumar Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Dr Alex Kumar

Shackleton in Space

Antarctica is a large flat egg-white expanse with bits of egg shell in it (aka the TransAntarctic mountain range) that is greater in area than India and China put together.

Exactly 100 years on from Scott and Shackleton, I travelled to Antarctica and spent around one year living at Concordia, a joint French-Italian inland Antarctic research station as the Human Spaceflight Research MD to conduct research for the European Space Agency in an attempt to understand how far human physiology and psychology can be pushed towards a future manned mission to Mars.  It is one of the most remote outposts on the planet located in one of the world’s most extreme environments.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Alex Kumar

The most extreme place on the planet?
Environmental extremes experienced there include:

*  Enduring around 3 months of complete darkness, where the sun does not rise above the horizon
*  The world’s coldest temperatures dropping down below minus 80 degrees Celsius
*  Complete isolation with no means of escape for 9 months, simulating long duration space missions and life on the surface of another planet
*  Chronic hypobaric hypoxia being located at around 3800 metres equivalent altitude
*  Nothing lives outside the station for over 1,000 kilometres, in nearly all directions.
*  Our nearest neighbours are the astronauts orbiting the earth on board the International Space Station, and then some Russians snowed* in at Vostok station (* = it does not actually ‘snow’ inside Antarctica).

Answering the job advertisement for what may be the coldest and loneliest job in the world, I found packing my mind for a year away was much more difficult than my bags.

“The uttermost end of the world”

To travel to the moon from the base would only take three days – far less than the three weeks it took to fly from London to Hobart and then to sail by icebreaker across the Southern Ocean, battling high seas, whales and being stuck in the ice pack with leopard seals before reaching a 60,000-strong rookery and football stadium’s worth of Adélie penguins.  The stench nearly turned me back home.

Antarctica is an ill defined space in people’s minds.  It incorporates South Georgia and other sub Antarctic islands, which are in fact closer to South America than the continent of Antarctica itself.  People can and have sailed to South Georgia even during its winter.  Whereas the interior of Antarctica remains an inpenetrable block of ice.  Even a team led by Sir Ranulph Fiennes’ (Coldest Journey) could not penetrate the continent’s interior during winter.

The longest on-call 

Antarctica is full of surprises (and penguins).  Adding to that it was the first time since the station opened 10 years previously that there would be just one doctor overwintering – that was to be me, since another doctor left the base just before winter began.  It was a game of Tag and I was ‘it’.  I can’t complain now about a set of nights or hardship on-call after doing nearly a year on-call in Antarctica.

The journey wasn’t over, it had just begun.  After flying a further five-hour flight inland in a Twin Otter over the Great White Silence, a blank white canvas.  Perhaps God had forgotten to paint this continent, intentionally I thought, as he took rest on the 7th day.

Alex Kumar, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Coldest science on earth

Antarctica’s ice layer protects and hides its secrets like a thick skin, stretched over the bedrock many thousands of feet below. Recent efforts at Russia’s Antarctic Vostok station tapped the veins of the sub-glacial lakes, which flow deep beneath the surface, that may harbour evidence of life forms of our distant past.  But as yet, this continent’s secrets remain teasingly elusive.

Ice cores plumbed out of the 800,000-year-old ice have told a story of their own – the impact of mankind on Earth and climate change. Century-old equipment was used in the discovery of a hole in the ozone – earth’s own flesh wound, which may yet scar over.

We conducted earth science research including glaciology, meteorology, seismology and astronomy, alongside my own research (on the adaptation of human health and well-being to this extreme environment), and trying to help in arranging the jigsaw pieces involved in sending a manned mission to Mars and back.

Curtain of darkness

As winter sets in, you stop living and start surviving.  Temperatures plummet below minus 80C. In May the sun sets for the last time.  A curtain of darkness falls, leaving you to endure three months of 24-hour darkness.  Spinning uncontrollably through the world’s time zones, leaving you gasping as you wake from unforgiving, hypoxia-euphoric vivid dreams.  The cold and isolation begin to seep in and your mind begins to stretch uncomfortably, as your senses become blunted by the sensory deprivation.

There is light at the end of the tunnel as multicoloured lights flicker overhead in the darkness, the Aurora Australis.

One way journey to the great beyond

Once you enter the Antarctic winter, you begin a personal journey of discovery and you will learn a lot about yourself.  You cannot turn back or go home.  Once that last plane departs, there is only one way up, you have to summit and there is no quitting, only crying along the way.

Alex Kumar, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Living and over-wintering as the only British national among a team of 13 Europeans in the most extreme and remote environment on the planet was not ‘easy’ but not so challenging as it was predictable.  As in any stressful environment living in an Antarctic station can be likened to living in one of the Old West frontier towns – a continual sense of not knowing who is going to shoot at who next or why.  As a team, we ate, slept, exercised, conducted science and survived alone frozen into the landscape in close proximity.  We all survived.

Not wanting to spoil the winter and many stories that came from it, I can summarise wintering in Antarctica in one sentence… it is one of the world’s only psychological marathons and one of the Earth’s greatest, most magnificent and most peculiar journeys.

‘I’ve been to Antarctica’

Tourists are so often bedazzled by Antarctica.  And the public are often impressed by those who have been there. It certainly is special.  However, all in all, you can say you have ‘been’ to Antarctica if you have flown in to work there for a few weeks or been on a cruise down there, during the breezy summertime.  Take heed, when this is so often thrown about in conversations and talks.

We are all just tourists when it comes to Antarctica

Really, you can never say you actually know Antarctica until you have wintered there.  And not just anywhere.    A winter on a subantarctic island such as South Georgia, Antarctica’s coast or peninsula (-20C climbing and skiing activities which can be accessible during the winter) is nothing like a winter in the interior of the continent (-80C in hypoxic darkness that is inaccessible for months).  And even a well connected wifi ridden winter in the interior nowadays is nothing like a broken radio winter in Shackleton’s day.  If you want real isolation, you’ll have to bury your head and phone in the ice.

My own conclusion?  Simple – Watching people around you unfold and unzip at the seams during wintering as a doctor is an interesting and can be an unforgiving past time.  For sure, people aren’t made of the same grit and stuff these days.  If you want to really experience something try to do it properly.  Challenge yourself and mankind.  What have you got to lose? … Only a few fingers or toes.

Alex Kumar, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

 

Alex has since worked in different space analogue environments and constructed the ‘White Mars’ research protocol for Sir Ranulph Fiennes. 

As an accomplished writer, photographer and public speaker, he has published articles in BBC News, New York Times and by invitation, recently held an exhibition at the Royal Photographic Society, featured in The Guardian.  

Alex now talks and works internationally for different organisations and humanitarian agencies, conducts global health research and continues to enjoy taking photos behind his camera and presenting in front of cameras for TV including BBC and Discovery, alongside his day to day NHS job and is a member of the EWM faculty.

Alex is continuing important work on a patent for a unique blend of cheerful and optimistic British sarcasm.

More information can be found at: www.AlexanderKumar.com  

Alex’s TED talk ‘Malaria to Mars’ can be found at: http://youtu.be/OukZ04e6kOM

 

 

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Extreme Undergraduate Medicine Conference: 7/8 March, 2015

ExtremeUndergradA collaboration between King’s College London Wilderness Society, Emergency Medicine Society and St George’s Pre-Hospital Care Society, this fantastically extreme event is for all students with an interest in Pre-hospital or Wilderness Medicine.

Extreme Medicine Conference 2015
Date: Saturday 7th and Sunday 8th March
Venue: King’s College London, Guy’s Campus, SE1 9RT
Timings: 09:00 – 18:00
Audience: Any student with an interest in Pre-hospital or Wilderness Medicine
Cost: £40 including all refreshments, certificates and entry to the conference social
Ticket Sales: http://www.kclsu.org/ents/event/2127/

KCL Wilderness Medicine Society, Emergency Medicine Society and St George’s Pre-hospital Care Society are delighted to announce that tickets are now available for the Second Annual Extreme Medicine Conference 2015. We are anticipating a multi-disciplinary audience with a range of skill sets and experiences. There is no such thing as too new or too experienced as our tailored program will ensure that every delegate gains from a wealth of knowledge and expertise​.

We have an amazing list of confirmed speakers including:

  • Dr Ben Singer – Pre-hospital ECMO
  • Lt Col Dr Guy Sanders – Trauma in Afghanistan and Haemorrhage Management
  • Dr Simon Jones – MSF and Expedition Medicine
  • Dr Jason Fitch – Dive Medicine
  • Sr Kay Mitchell​ – Extreme Physiology
  • Dr Andy Grieve – RAF – Assessing Patients in Extreme/Difficult Environments
  • Dr Russell Hearn – Wilderness Medicine in the US
  • Mr Michael Bradfield – King’s Sierra Leone Partnership

We are also awaiting confirmation from a couple of additional speakers.

We will also be hosting an interactive Careers Forum at the end of the conference delivered by some of the speakers.

There will be Clinical Skills Workshops on the Saturday afternoon and either Moulages or Masterclasses on the Sunday morning dependent on each delegate’s experience. We want to tailor make the Sunday morning to ensure that each delegate is able to maximise on the session. However any delegate can opt to attend the masterclasses if they would prefer. All teaching will be provided by ED/Anaesthetics Registrars and Senior Paramedics.

Masterclasses will include:

  • Primary Survey and Initial Management
  • Secondary Survey and Handovers
  • Scene Safety
  • Trauma Radiology – including a prize quiz

The Conference Social will be held at Guy’s Bar on Saturday evening and will be a great chance for everyone to get to know each other and network.

The link for the tickets is http://www.kclsu.org/ents/event/2127/ and non-KCL students will have to create a guest account which only takes a few minutes.

We look forward to welcoming as many of your students as can attend for what promises to be an excellent weekend of Pre-hospital and Wilderness Medicine.

 

Links
Expedition & Wilderness Medicine
KCLSU

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Antarctic Medical Conference 2015: Special Offer

Antarctic Wilderness Medicine ConferenceFree flights from Miami to Buenos Aires!

Secure complimentary flights from Miami to board expedition ship, National Geographic Explorer in Buenos Aires on 7th December for the iconic Antarctic Medical Conference, when you book with Lindblad Expeditions & mention Expedition & Wilderness Medicine’s medical conference.

Expect breathtaking scenery and huge photo opportunities on this voyage; whales, penguins & a multitude of seabirds:  7th – 20th December.

To read more about this life changing experience visit our Antarctic web-page HERE

 

 Links
Antarctic Medical Conference

EWM course portfolio

 

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