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Consultant Physican – Infectious Disease: Alice Springs

Head Medical are promoting an incredible opportunity for a Consultant Physician in Infectious Diseases.  The role is based in Alice Spring and would suit someone who Find medical jobs in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Gulf Region, Canada and UK through Head Medicalenjoys biking & hiking!

As Staff Specialist in Infectious Diseases your responsibilities will include (but are not limited to):
§ Providing ongoing leadership in the department and the hospital, focusing on patient safety and the exceptional services.
§ Delivering first class inpatient, outpatient and consultative clinical services in General Medicine and Infectious Diseases.
§ Initiating and participating in quality management projects and staff professional development programs.
§ Supervise and participate in teaching programs for junior medical staff, including advanced trainees and medical students.

§ Participate in antimicrobial stewardship.

A full description of the role is available on our jobs page, HERE

Head Medical are the UK’s leading international medical recruitment specialist. They recruit Doctors for fantastic positions in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and the Gulf. They also recruit for jobs in the UK.  They’re committed to turning your ideas and career goals into reality with the right job in the right location.

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Take a look at our latest newsletter to find out more about the amazingly adventurous Dr Andrew Peacock

 

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Have you booked your place for Dartmoor ’15? We’ll host our next Expedition & Wilderness Medicine course, 16 – 19 November and have new additional content on offer. Places are filling up fast, so if you’re keen to kick-start your Expedition Medicine career join us North Devon.

What’s a ‘traditional’ medicine career?

Dr Andrew Peacock works with us as a faculty member and also as Medical Director for Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Australia. Andrew recently spoke with RedBull.com about his adventurous career, giving an insight into how he balances a passion for outdoor pursuits and medicine. Click HERE to learn what makes the most adventurous of medics tick.

Poster competition

We’re super pleased with our new look Extreme Medicine Conference website. We’ve just added a page for our poster competition.
We’ve made it nice and easy for you to register and submit your abstract. Click HERE to be taken straight to the poster page.

Blogging for all the right reasons.

According to Uncharted Expeditions, “PTSD is a growing epidemic and the dialogue needs to continue for others to step out of the silence and get help”. In this blog one paramedic is finding peace in the mountains and she’s sharing her experiences.
This is a frank and brave blog, but one that is of great value to the writer and will hopefully help many others along the way. THIS LINK will take you straight there.

Antarctic job opportunity

The University of Texas Medical Branch is looking for an Emergency or Family Medicine physician with acute care experience to join them at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
You must have US citizenship, a US medical license and a love for dark snowy places.
The clinical load will is light, but the opportunity to work in this remote location should appeal to physicians interested in extreme and altitude medicine. This role provides a number of rare experiences like a view of the Aurora Australis and Milky Way from a perspective few others are fortunate experience.
Visit our jobs page HERE for more information and the relevant application contact details.

Kili’ opportunity

Action Challenge are looking for a medic to join their Kilimanjaro expedition, August 20 – 30. This expedition will follow the Lemosho route. The medic must be a fully qualified doctor – altitude experience and expedition medicine course attendance is preferred, but not essential and expenses for the trip will be covered.
If you’re looking for an adventure taking you up the world’s highest free standing mountain and are keen to tick off one of the Seven Summits, this could be right up your street.
For more information, take a look at the job advert HERE or to contact Action Challenge direct, call James Holland on +44 (0)20 7609 6695.

It’s your time to shine

If you have a story to share or know we want to hear from you. Blogs, vlogs interviews etc. are all welcomed, click HERE to share your experiences.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

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New roles overseas

WeFind medical jobs in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Gulf Region, Canada and UK through Head Medical‘re delighted to be working with specialist international medical recruiter Head Medical to promote some of their more interesting roles.

Arranging a position overseas is exciting, but Head Medical understand that it can also be a complex and time-consuming process. They’re the UK’s specialist in international medical recruitment and have helped many Doctors relocate since first starting in 2008. They know it’s important to balance career opportunities with lifestyle so they’ll talk through your plans and get to know you to make sure they find the right role in the right location.

Once they’ve secured a job for you, they’ll manage the Medical Registration and Visa application process, and support you throughout the relocation.

Check out these incredible opportunities:

GENERAL PRACTITIONER – RURAL ALBERTA, CANADA
3 permanent GP positions available with a well-established rural private practice based in Western Alberta.

This is an excellent chance to experience and explore the stunning natural beauty of Canada; you will be working with and making a positive impact on a local community while being exceptionally rewarded with high earnings and excellent benefits.

  • Earnings of £162,000 to over £270,000 per annum
  • CAN $10,000 towards relocation costs
  • Accommodation is available; either single units or family homes. These are all paid for apart from utilities (which are at a reduced rate)
  • Car hire paid for 1 year

The Role

Working closely with the local community, the practice aims to effectively and efficiently develop and administer programs and services. You will be working on a fee for service basis.

The practice is open 5 days per week, 8.30am – 5pm. There are also emergency on-calls at the local hospital (on average they will be 6-10 per month but more shifts are available). Weekend rates are higher during the week. As this is a rural position you will need to have skills in Emergency Medicine.

Requirements

  • To be considered for this position you must have MRCGP (acquired through examination)
  • You will ideally have your ATLS, BASICS or proven trauma and emergency medicine experience

For further information, contact Yan Scouller on 0131 240 5274 or email yan@headmedical.com

REMOTE GENERAL PHYSICIAN – AUSTRALIA

  • Challenging and complex medicine
  • Fantastic clinical job
  • Unique environment – adventure of a lifetime
  • Supportive and enthusiastic colleagues
  • Lucrative remuneration package and benefits

​This is an amazing opportunity for a General Physician with an adventurous spirit and desire to make a difference to the health and well-being of an amazing community in outback Australia.

The job is arguably the most exciting general medicine position in Australia and would attract a committed and dynamic medical professional who can think on their feet, work autonomously and enjoy one of the most remote places on earth that also has unique health challenges.

Based within a township some 300 km from Darwin you will also continue to develop a significant outreach program that has already made some instrumental gains in health care in the region.

There are very high rates of rheumatic heart disease, glomerulonephritis, diabetic retinopathy, infectious diseases and respiratory illnesses. Most of the health care issues are poverty related with life expectancy being only 45 in the region. Applicants with interests in renal, infectious diseases, respiratory, gastroenterology, cardiology or endocrinology will be highly regarded and would add real value to the service.

This position would suit General Physicians qualified in either the UK, Ireland, USA, Canada or South Africa. Your communication skills will be first class and you must be interested in working within a cross-cultural environment, across all ages.

A first class remuneration package (circa GBP150k and above plus benefits) will be awarded.

For further information, contact Alasdair Spinner on 0131 240 5276 or email al@headmedical.com

GENERAL PHYSICIAN – REMOTE & RURAL SPECIALIST – AUSTRALIA
Physician with an adventurous spirit required for an outback town in North West Queensland. If you are looking for a total change in practise and experience, this role could be for you.

We are seeking a General Physician to join a team in Mount Isa Hospital, which is also considered a centre of excellence for remote and rural training.

  • Competitive remuneration package (up to AUD$400k dependent on experience)
  • Experience the real Australian Outback
  • Wide variety of cases and opportunities to teach
  • Opportunity to make a real difference
  • We support you in obtaining medical registration and work visa
  • You will have broad range of experience and enjoy working in a multidisciplinary team setting

The Medical Ward has 24 beds and consultative services are provided to the surgical and maternity wards. In addition, there is a 5-bed high dependency unit. Most referrals arise from acute medical cases seen by the emergency department or from medical, diabetic or specialist outreach Outpatient Clinics.

Ideally you will hold FRACP (or equivalent specialist qualification), and be registered or eligible for registration with the Medical Board of Australia as a Senior Medical Officer or Specialist Physician. You must have also experience and interest in working with remote and rural communities.

The Location

Although Mount Isa is a small town, established as a result of the mining industry, it is home to a variety of different cultures with a population of 25,000 and services a region spanning 300,000 square kilometres. Jump in the four wheel drive and explore the outback, do a bit of fishing, or camp out under the stars. And if you’ve never been to a rodeo, this could your chance.

The local airport has regular flights to Brisbane and ongoing international connections.

In this role, you will experience a supportive community and a relaxed lifestyle in a truly unique environment, as well as a diverse patient mix and an excellent remuneration package.

For further information, contact Caroline O’Hagan on 0131 240 5276 or email caroline@headmedical.com

 

SENIOR MEDICAL OFFICER – AUSTRALIA
Fantastic management and clinical opportunity, giving you the chance to lead a vital service with an outstanding salary and benefits package on offer.

  • Salary £220,722 to £261,763 per year
  • Housing at a subsidised rental rate
  • Car provided
  • End of service gratuity

The Role

An enthusiastic Senior Medical Officer (SMO) required to lead a team in the beautiful East Kimberley region of Western Australia, based in Kununurra. The East Kimberley SMO position is a combined clinical and administrative role responsible for administrative duties and supervision/support for other medical staff working in the Kununurra, Wyndham and Halls Creek hospitals. The SMO reports to the Operations Manager at Kununurra Hospital, working closely with each site’s Director of Nursing and liaises with the Kimberley Director of Medical Services on operational and strategic issues for the hospitals. Clinical duties will include involvement in the Emergency Department and/or GP Clinic at each hospital.

Appointment to this position is based on skills and experience with a minimum requirement of 12 years’ experience in general practice environment.

Experience in rural hospital settings desired. The Kimberley region has a high Aboriginal population as well as a large transient population, which impact the health services. Three quarters of attendance to hospitals with in the Kimberley are for semi-urgent and non-urgent. The leading cause of emergency attendance for Kimberley residents are skin related diseases and disorders; injuries; toxic or drug effects; ear, nose, throat respiratory system problems. This is a fixed term position with the opportunity to work flexible hours allowing time off for professional development and long holidays.

For further information, contact Yan Scouller on 0131 240 5274 or email yan@headmedical.com

LINKS
Expedition & Wilderness Medicine logo
Attend an Expedition & Wilderness Medicine training course to enhance your employability.

 

 

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Calling snow-loving doctors!

Life-changing opportunity for a physician to deploy to the North Poleutmb-Polar-Ops-Side-Banner_2 with the US Center for Polar Medical Operations (CPMO).

You’ll need to be a US citizen, have a US medical licence, hold a valid passport and not averse to the cold, the snow and the dark!  In return, you’ll have a unique experience, enjoyed by few others on the planet.  You’ll be rewarded with fantastic other-worldly snow-scapes and acres of stars in night-time Polar skies.

The CPMO is hosted at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB).  Here, they support the National Science Foundation’s US Antarctic Program (USAP) and they seek a doctor to work at one of the scientific research stations in Antarctica.

The Amundsen-Scott South Pole station is one of the most isolated places on earth. CPMO are looking for an Emergency or Family Medicine physician with acute care experience who is up for the challenge of working at 10,000 feet during the depths of the Antarctic Winter.

While the clinical load is light, the opportunity to work in this remote situation will be attractive to physicians with interests in extreme/remote or altitude medicine.  Practice medicine under the Aurora Australis and see the Milky Way as few others ever will, all while providing health care to the station crew.

The South Pole Station carries out exciting research in astronomy, weather, geology and supports other science missions. Deployments are 9 months, and US citizenship is required.  Warm, shared accommodation is provided as are  recreational facilities, internet and telephone access.  CPMO are also recruiting for winter staff at the McMurdo and Palmer Stations.

For more information, please visit www.usap.gov or www.utmb.edu/polar

Call 409-772-3626 if you are interested or apply on-line at www.utmb.edu/polar.

 

Links
Polar Medicine Course
World Extreme Medicine Conference

 

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The view from EWM towers is a very exciting one and here’s why.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

News and updates

The view from EWM towers is a very exciting one and here’s why.

Moving forward

We’re delighted to announce the development of a new postgraduate education programme in Expedition, Wilderness and Extreme Medicine where students will work towards a Certificate, Diploma and MSc.
Building on over a decade of successful evolving courses to highlight Expedition Medicine as a career option, we feel that now is the right time to take a step forward and offer a formal postgraduate programme that matches the increasing levels of clinical governance in this field. We think you’ll all agree that this is really exciting for us at EWM, but also for medics out there who wish to formalise the learning and skills they have picked up in this exciting field of medicine.
If you’re interested and would like to hear more news as we announce it, be sure to sign up to our postgraduate mailing list HERE.

Next stop…
..New Zealand.

To be a little more precise we’ll be off to the beautiful Southern Alps for our ever popular Polar Medicine course. There are only a few spaces left so click HEREif you’re thinking of joining us.

Course News

We listen to our delegates and as part of our improvement strategy extended our next UK based course, to four full days. The course, which will be held in Dartmoor, will allow time for additional learning, a little more free time and greater networking opportunities. For more information visit our Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Dartmoor page HERE.

Interns/Electives

Great news for our readership who approach us about intern posts or electives. We are re-establishing our EWMi programme to accept an intern on each of our UK based courses. For more information on the application process click HERE.
If you have any questions about electives we’d recommend you take a look at what our great friends at Adventure Medic are doing. It’s a fantastic resource which contains accounts from returning medics, but check out their resources section for elective opportunities!

We want to hear from you

Your experiences: We love a good blog (or vlog) that shares your experiences with the wider world. EWM was born out of adventure and although we’re passionate about delivering high quality training, adventure is still in our soul and we enjoy reading your tales and admiring your photos.

Your photos: Photography is another passion of ours, bridging languages, sharing culture and stirring the deepest emotions. If you have a great snap you’d like to see appear in our newsletter then get in touch HERE 
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Antarctic Medical Conference 2015: Fight offer

Free flights from Miami to Buenos Aires!

Antarctic Wilderness Medicine Conference

Secure complimentary flights from Miami to board expedition ship, National Geographic Explorer in Buenos Aires on 7th December for the iconic Antarctic Medical Conference, when you book with Lindblad Expeditions & mention Expedition & Wilderness Medicine’s medical conference.

Expect breathtaking scenery and huge photo opportunities on this voyage; whales, penguins & a multitude of seabirds: 7th – 20th December. With CME content accredited for 10 hours by the Wilderness Medicine Society and delivered by Dr Alex Kumar.

To read more about this life changing experience visit our Antarctic web-page HERE

This offer is time limited and due to expire 3oth June 2015, so don’t hang around.

 

Links

Antarctic Medical Conference  

EWM course portfolio

EWM Facebook

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Fanfare please! This week, we passed 75,000 “likes” on the Expedition Medicine Facebook page

Sir Ranulph FiennesLearning that we now reach so many medics across the globe has made us feel pretty good, so we’re offering a 7.5% discount on the cost of Expo tickets* until 12.30UTC on Sunday 3rd May.

Simply visit the Expo page:  www.extrememedicineexpo.com and enter the code: FB75KLIKES when registering to receive your discount.

Facebook enables us to extend the Extreme Medicine community far and wide with news, updates and camp fire tales from adventurous medics, so while you have your web-browser open, visit www.facebook.com/ExpeditionMedicine and “like” our page.

 

Links
Facebook
World Extreme Medicine Conference

 

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Short term medic opportunity – Doctor required in Central America 18th April – 19th May

Gapforce require a motivated medic to support their expedition medicine course starting 18th April.gapFORCElogo

You will be responsible for:

  •  Providing Medical support to all members of Gapforce expeditions.
  •  Monitor and safeguard the general health and hygiene of their expedition group
  •  Provide immediate emergency medical care to participants and staff
  •  Teach basic medical lessons

You need to:

  • Be an F2 doctor (minimum)
  • Have experience in Expedition Medicine

In return you will receive:

  •  Meals
  •  Accommodation
  •  A travel bursary (varies depending on the length of your availability)

 

Contact Lauren Nethercot

laurennethercot@gapforce.org

0207 384 3028

 

Links

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

Sir Ranulph Fiennes

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White Mars: Doctoring in the Coldest Place on Earth

Extreme medicine and expedition doctor Alexander Kumar provides an account of his time spent working in one of  the coldest places in Antarctica and one of the few true extreme environments on Planet Earth.  Known for his sense of humour, he has lived, worked and travelled through over 80 countries all over the world, including the Amazon and extensively across the Arctic and the Antarctic a few times also over the past 10 years

Alex Kumar Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Dr Alex Kumar

Shackleton in Space

Antarctica is a large flat egg-white expanse with bits of egg shell in it (aka the TransAntarctic mountain range) that is greater in area than India and China put together.

Exactly 100 years on from Scott and Shackleton, I travelled to Antarctica and spent around one year living at Concordia, a joint French-Italian inland Antarctic research station as the Human Spaceflight Research MD to conduct research for the European Space Agency in an attempt to understand how far human physiology and psychology can be pushed towards a future manned mission to Mars.  It is one of the most remote outposts on the planet located in one of the world’s most extreme environments.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Alex Kumar

The most extreme place on the planet?
Environmental extremes experienced there include:

*  Enduring around 3 months of complete darkness, where the sun does not rise above the horizon
*  The world’s coldest temperatures dropping down below minus 80 degrees Celsius
*  Complete isolation with no means of escape for 9 months, simulating long duration space missions and life on the surface of another planet
*  Chronic hypobaric hypoxia being located at around 3800 metres equivalent altitude
*  Nothing lives outside the station for over 1,000 kilometres, in nearly all directions.
*  Our nearest neighbours are the astronauts orbiting the earth on board the International Space Station, and then some Russians snowed* in at Vostok station (* = it does not actually ‘snow’ inside Antarctica).

Answering the job advertisement for what may be the coldest and loneliest job in the world, I found packing my mind for a year away was much more difficult than my bags.

“The uttermost end of the world”

To travel to the moon from the base would only take three days – far less than the three weeks it took to fly from London to Hobart and then to sail by icebreaker across the Southern Ocean, battling high seas, whales and being stuck in the ice pack with leopard seals before reaching a 60,000-strong rookery and football stadium’s worth of Adélie penguins.  The stench nearly turned me back home.

Antarctica is an ill defined space in people’s minds.  It incorporates South Georgia and other sub Antarctic islands, which are in fact closer to South America than the continent of Antarctica itself.  People can and have sailed to South Georgia even during its winter.  Whereas the interior of Antarctica remains an inpenetrable block of ice.  Even a team led by Sir Ranulph Fiennes’ (Coldest Journey) could not penetrate the continent’s interior during winter.

The longest on-call 

Antarctica is full of surprises (and penguins).  Adding to that it was the first time since the station opened 10 years previously that there would be just one doctor overwintering – that was to be me, since another doctor left the base just before winter began.  It was a game of Tag and I was ‘it’.  I can’t complain now about a set of nights or hardship on-call after doing nearly a year on-call in Antarctica.

The journey wasn’t over, it had just begun.  After flying a further five-hour flight inland in a Twin Otter over the Great White Silence, a blank white canvas.  Perhaps God had forgotten to paint this continent, intentionally I thought, as he took rest on the 7th day.

Alex Kumar, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Coldest science on earth

Antarctica’s ice layer protects and hides its secrets like a thick skin, stretched over the bedrock many thousands of feet below. Recent efforts at Russia’s Antarctic Vostok station tapped the veins of the sub-glacial lakes, which flow deep beneath the surface, that may harbour evidence of life forms of our distant past.  But as yet, this continent’s secrets remain teasingly elusive.

Ice cores plumbed out of the 800,000-year-old ice have told a story of their own – the impact of mankind on Earth and climate change. Century-old equipment was used in the discovery of a hole in the ozone – earth’s own flesh wound, which may yet scar over.

We conducted earth science research including glaciology, meteorology, seismology and astronomy, alongside my own research (on the adaptation of human health and well-being to this extreme environment), and trying to help in arranging the jigsaw pieces involved in sending a manned mission to Mars and back.

Curtain of darkness

As winter sets in, you stop living and start surviving.  Temperatures plummet below minus 80C. In May the sun sets for the last time.  A curtain of darkness falls, leaving you to endure three months of 24-hour darkness.  Spinning uncontrollably through the world’s time zones, leaving you gasping as you wake from unforgiving, hypoxia-euphoric vivid dreams.  The cold and isolation begin to seep in and your mind begins to stretch uncomfortably, as your senses become blunted by the sensory deprivation.

There is light at the end of the tunnel as multicoloured lights flicker overhead in the darkness, the Aurora Australis.

One way journey to the great beyond

Once you enter the Antarctic winter, you begin a personal journey of discovery and you will learn a lot about yourself.  You cannot turn back or go home.  Once that last plane departs, there is only one way up, you have to summit and there is no quitting, only crying along the way.

Alex Kumar, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Living and over-wintering as the only British national among a team of 13 Europeans in the most extreme and remote environment on the planet was not ‘easy’ but not so challenging as it was predictable.  As in any stressful environment living in an Antarctic station can be likened to living in one of the Old West frontier towns – a continual sense of not knowing who is going to shoot at who next or why.  As a team, we ate, slept, exercised, conducted science and survived alone frozen into the landscape in close proximity.  We all survived.

Not wanting to spoil the winter and many stories that came from it, I can summarise wintering in Antarctica in one sentence… it is one of the world’s only psychological marathons and one of the Earth’s greatest, most magnificent and most peculiar journeys.

‘I’ve been to Antarctica’

Tourists are so often bedazzled by Antarctica.  And the public are often impressed by those who have been there. It certainly is special.  However, all in all, you can say you have ‘been’ to Antarctica if you have flown in to work there for a few weeks or been on a cruise down there, during the breezy summertime.  Take heed, when this is so often thrown about in conversations and talks.

We are all just tourists when it comes to Antarctica

Really, you can never say you actually know Antarctica until you have wintered there.  And not just anywhere.    A winter on a subantarctic island such as South Georgia, Antarctica’s coast or peninsula (-20C climbing and skiing activities which can be accessible during the winter) is nothing like a winter in the interior of the continent (-80C in hypoxic darkness that is inaccessible for months).  And even a well connected wifi ridden winter in the interior nowadays is nothing like a broken radio winter in Shackleton’s day.  If you want real isolation, you’ll have to bury your head and phone in the ice.

My own conclusion?  Simple – Watching people around you unfold and unzip at the seams during wintering as a doctor is an interesting and can be an unforgiving past time.  For sure, people aren’t made of the same grit and stuff these days.  If you want to really experience something try to do it properly.  Challenge yourself and mankind.  What have you got to lose? … Only a few fingers or toes.

Alex Kumar, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

 

Alex has since worked in different space analogue environments and constructed the ‘White Mars’ research protocol for Sir Ranulph Fiennes. 

As an accomplished writer, photographer and public speaker, he has published articles in BBC News, New York Times and by invitation, recently held an exhibition at the Royal Photographic Society, featured in The Guardian.  

Alex now talks and works internationally for different organisations and humanitarian agencies, conducts global health research and continues to enjoy taking photos behind his camera and presenting in front of cameras for TV including BBC and Discovery, alongside his day to day NHS job and is a member of the EWM faculty.

Alex is continuing important work on a patent for a unique blend of cheerful and optimistic British sarcasm.

More information can be found at: www.AlexanderKumar.com  

Alex’s TED talk ‘Malaria to Mars’ can be found at: http://youtu.be/OukZ04e6kOM

 

 

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Extreme Undergraduate Medicine Conference: 7/8 March, 2015

ExtremeUndergradA collaboration between King’s College London Wilderness Society, Emergency Medicine Society and St George’s Pre-Hospital Care Society, this fantastically extreme event is for all students with an interest in Pre-hospital or Wilderness Medicine.

Extreme Medicine Conference 2015
Date: Saturday 7th and Sunday 8th March
Venue: King’s College London, Guy’s Campus, SE1 9RT
Timings: 09:00 – 18:00
Audience: Any student with an interest in Pre-hospital or Wilderness Medicine
Cost: £40 including all refreshments, certificates and entry to the conference social
Ticket Sales: http://www.kclsu.org/ents/event/2127/

KCL Wilderness Medicine Society, Emergency Medicine Society and St George’s Pre-hospital Care Society are delighted to announce that tickets are now available for the Second Annual Extreme Medicine Conference 2015. We are anticipating a multi-disciplinary audience with a range of skill sets and experiences. There is no such thing as too new or too experienced as our tailored program will ensure that every delegate gains from a wealth of knowledge and expertise​.

We have an amazing list of confirmed speakers including:

  • Dr Ben Singer – Pre-hospital ECMO
  • Lt Col Dr Guy Sanders – Trauma in Afghanistan and Haemorrhage Management
  • Dr Simon Jones – MSF and Expedition Medicine
  • Dr Jason Fitch – Dive Medicine
  • Sr Kay Mitchell​ – Extreme Physiology
  • Dr Andy Grieve – RAF – Assessing Patients in Extreme/Difficult Environments
  • Dr Russell Hearn – Wilderness Medicine in the US
  • Mr Michael Bradfield – King’s Sierra Leone Partnership

We are also awaiting confirmation from a couple of additional speakers.

We will also be hosting an interactive Careers Forum at the end of the conference delivered by some of the speakers.

There will be Clinical Skills Workshops on the Saturday afternoon and either Moulages or Masterclasses on the Sunday morning dependent on each delegate’s experience. We want to tailor make the Sunday morning to ensure that each delegate is able to maximise on the session. However any delegate can opt to attend the masterclasses if they would prefer. All teaching will be provided by ED/Anaesthetics Registrars and Senior Paramedics.

Masterclasses will include:

  • Primary Survey and Initial Management
  • Secondary Survey and Handovers
  • Scene Safety
  • Trauma Radiology – including a prize quiz

The Conference Social will be held at Guy’s Bar on Saturday evening and will be a great chance for everyone to get to know each other and network.

The link for the tickets is http://www.kclsu.org/ents/event/2127/ and non-KCL students will have to create a guest account which only takes a few minutes.

We look forward to welcoming as many of your students as can attend for what promises to be an excellent weekend of Pre-hospital and Wilderness Medicine.

 

Links
Expedition & Wilderness Medicine
KCLSU

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