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Pre-Hospital Care Workshop – Press Release

Learning from experienceLondon HEMS

London’s Air Ambulance & Extreme Medicine to host two-day Pre-Hospital Care Workshop

For 25 years London’s Air Ambulance has been at the forefront of pre-hospital emergency medicine, gaining a reputation for clinical excellence and pioneering procedures which have been adopted across the world.

Next month, ahead of the World Extreme Medicine Expo, on the 6th and 7th of November, London’s Air Ambulance is hosting a two-day Pre-Hospital Care Workshop as a precursor to the Extreme Medicine Conference 2014 to give delegates and medical practitioners an insight into the work of the charity and to share some of its advanced practices.

The charity has achieved survival figures for traumatic cardiac arrest and pre-hospital thoracotomy, and success rates for adult and paediatric intubation, which are among the highest in the world.

The workshop will give practitioners the opportunity to get involved with medical demonstrations and scenario based exercises while also providing access to the senior consultants and paramedics responsible for London’s Air Ambulance governance, major incident planning, research and innovation.

Speaking about the event, consultant and education lead, Dr Gareth Grier said“London’s Air Ambulance has treated over 31,000 patients, which we recognise is a huge amount of experience and learning developed over 25 years. By passing on this knowledge we can help to drive excellence in pre-hospital care standards”.

“Many of the techniques we have pioneered have become widespread as a result of being heard and talked about at events such as this one. During the workshop we will be showcasing some of our more recent innovations, REBOA being one of them, discussing the future of pre-hospital care, challenging conventional wisdom and hopefully, inspiring the next generation of trauma specialists”.

Earlier this year London’s Air Ambulance became the first service to perform roadside balloon surgery to control severe internal bleeding on a patient who had fallen from height.  Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA) is just one of the practical demonstrations delegates can participate in amid a programme that will look at biological terrorism, crew resource management at complex pre-hospital scenes and the role of a UK pre-hospital doctor in the international response to humanitarian disasters.

For full programme details or to book visit: www.londonsairambulance.co.uk. Tickets start at £125 for medical students rising to £595 for doctors.

 

END ———pre hospital care

Enquiries:

London’s Air Ambulance                                                         Tel: (0)20 7220 5498

Katy Evans (Senior Media Liaison & Public Affairs Officer)

k.evans@londonsairambulance.co.uk

 

Notes to Editors

More about the Pre-Hospital Care Workshop

 Date: Thursday 6th and Friday 7th November 2014

Venue: Wellcome Collection, 183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE

Ticket prices: Doctors £595 / Paramedics, Nurses & other medical professionals £195 / Medical Students £125. Book tickets.

 

Programme Overview: london hems

Day One

Seminar topics:

Introduction and overview of London’s Air Ambulance and Pre-hospital Care in the UK

The role of a UK pre-hospital doctor in the international response to humanitarian disasters

Biological Terrorism

Crew Resource Management at complex pre-hospital scenes

The medical response to major incidents in London

Workshops:

Pre-hospital advanced airway

Emergency thoracotomy

Emergency Neurosurgery

Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA)

 

Day Two

Seminar topics:

Pre-hospital blood transfusion in civilian trauma

Damage control anaesthesia – lessons from Afghanistan and London

Opportunities for medical students in pre-hospital care

Paramedic scene leadership during advanced pre-hospital interventions

Defying medical dogma – case studies from the pre-hospital phase

The future in pre-hospital care Nanorobots and suspended animation

Workshops:

Various scenario based training exercises

 

Extreme Medicine Conference 2014

Extreme Medicine Conference

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Extreme Survivor Anna Bågenholm talks about her local environment

Anna Bagenholm and Polar Medicine

Talking at the Extreme Medicine Conference

Working as a Radiologist at the North Norway Universital hospital, I am used to dealing with extreme medicine physiology and logistics on regular basis.  At our remote location, our hospital takes care of 500 000 inhabitants living across a vast area, including the beautiful remoteness of Svalbard.  I have treated people following polar bear attacks, avalanches, mountain falls and shipwrecks. Our hospital receive patients following long medevac; by ambulance, helicopter or plane flight, or by bad fly weather up to 8-10 hours in a road ambulance.  Our remote location leaves us vulnerable but teamwork plays a big part in all we do so we make good use of new technologies, including teleradiology, which I use on a daily basis.

Personally, I am so grateful to the people at the University Hospital in North Norway not only for having the opportunity to work together with them as senior doctor but also for that I can maintain my medical career after having a bad skiing accident in 1999.

The accident gave me a core  body temperature of 13.7 degrees and no heart beat for 2 hours and 45 minutes. The medical team never gave up on me and their knowledge of extreme physiology saved me. Their slogan was

“nobody is dead until warm and dead.”

After 1 hour helicopter transportation, 9 hours in the operating room, 6 days on ECMO, 6 days on kidney replacement therapy, 5 weeks on a ventilator and 1-2 years partially paralysed from the neck down, I now lead a completely normal life, helping other patients.

We should think of extreme medicine as an important and normal part of medicine.  We never know when we might need to draw upon our knowledge of extreme physiology and associated logistics.  Being prepared is the best way to handle the situation.

 

 

Hear Anna talk at the Extreme Medicine Conference 2014

 

 

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We love simple new ideas that potentially save lives… GoodSAM

GoodSAM medical appBy day Mark Wilson as as a Neurosurgeon at Imperial. He also works with London’s Air Ambulance. His specialist area is acute brain problems especially traumatic brain injury (and in particular it’s hyperacute management). by in his spare time he is the developer of a life-saving mobile phone called GoodSAM that crowd sources off-duty doctors, nurses and paramedics to local life threatening emergencies

Mark has worked extensively overseas both clinically and as an expedition doctor. Locations include India, Nepal, the Arctic, South Africa, and Australia as a GP and as a researcher with NASA. His research areas include the effects of altitude and microgravity on the cerebral circulation, the former of which he extensively researched during the 2007 Xtreme Everest expedition.

He authored The Medic’s Guide to Work and Electives Around the World in 2000 which is now in it’s 3rd edition.

GoodSAM an  App that crowd sources off-duty doctors, nurses and paramedics to local life threatening emergencies – GoodSAM. Please take a look and register!

https://www.goodsamapp.org/home

 

Mark is speaking at the 2014 Extreme Medicine Conference - meet him there…

 

Sir Ranulph Fiennes and Extreme Medicine

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2 Vacancies: Combined Diving & Hyperbaric Medicine / Emergency Medicine

Two 6 month junior / middle grade doctor posts available – one commencing Feb 2015, the other Aug 2015.  Includes funded enrolment in Postgraduate Certificate in Remote Healthcare

DDRCDDRC Healthcare is a charity providing hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO), training and research in Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine and associated fields.  In conjunction with Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, we are looking to appoint two junior doctors for 6 month posts – one doctor to commence February 2015 and the other August 2015.

The post will be an average of 6 sessions per week at DDRC and 4 sessions per week in the Emergency Department. We are looking for Doctors with a minimum of 2 years experience post qualification.  You must have full registration with the GMC or be eligible to become fully registered.

Derriford Hospital is adjacent to DDRC and is the largest teaching hospital in the southwest with a busy Emergency Department. DDRC provides HBO for elective and emergency patients for conditions including Decompression Illness, tissue damage secondary to radiotherapy and diabetic ulcers.

Training will be provided in Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine and successful candidates will be encouraged and funded to enrol in the Postgraduate Certificate in Remote Healthcare run by the Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry.

There is no on call commitment for the diving aspect of this post however individuals will be encouraged to be involved in the management of diving accidents. The ED sessions may include some night shifts.

 

For application form and further information see Employment section www.ddrc.org

To discuss the job or to arrange a visit – please contact Dr Christine Penny – info@ddrc.org or 01752 209999

Closing date: 18.08.2014 (08.00) interview date: 05.09.2014

 

Courses and Conferences of Interest

Expedition Medicine Courses

Expedition Medicine Conference

Diving & Marine Medicine
Sir Ranulph Fiennes

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Extreme Medicine Faculty creates a media stir in the Space Medicine arena

The genetic secrets of  a species of frog that hibernates for months could hold the key to safer space voyages, say scientists.

Researchers from the University of Queensland, headed up by Extreme Medicine speaker Professor Craig Franklin, say that ability of the burrowing frog species Cyclorana alboguttata to maintain muscle mass while dormant could help overcome the problem of astronaut’s own muscles deteriorating during long trips in zero gravity.

medical speakers(c) The Independant

Although floating weightless in space is something many would-be astronauts dream of, this unique environment takes its toll – leaving muscles drastically under-used and causing a number of health problems from tendonitis to fat accumulation.

With a manned mission to Mars taking anywhere between 39 and 289 days depending on how close the planet is, astronauts would certainly benefit from anything that ensured they were in top physical condition upon arrival on the planet’s surface.

Scientists studying the frog say that that one of its genes known as ‘survivin’ could help. When faced with droughts in their native Australia, the frog survives by burrowing underground and covering itself with a cocoon of shed skin.

Not even football in space will keep astronauts’ healthy.

Read more: China stakes its claims on Mars with 2020 rover Nasa ‘flying saucer’ splashes back down to Earth in test One of the most Earth-like planets in the galaxy discovered

This keeps them relatively insulated from harm – but the survivin gene is necessary to protect them from their own bodies. Cells have many different ‘suicide mechanisms’ but one in particular kicks in to remove matter that is apparently damaged – something it judges by long periods of inactivity. Survivin stops this from happening.

“If we can understand the cell signalling pathways that confer resistance to muscle wasting, then these could be useful candidates to study in mammalian muscle atrophy,” said PhD student Beau Reilly in a press release.

“These could help to develop therapies to treat bedridden human patients or even astronauts, who frequently lose muscle tone when exposed to reduced-gravity conditions.”

This sort of research could be even more important for journeys into space further afield than Mars. If scientists can’t develop faster propulsion technology in the future then even travelling to nearby stars could take tens of thousands of years.

“I am fascinated in animals that survive in extreme conditions” said Miss Reilly. “I think humans and modern medicine could learn a great deal from organisms such as burrowing frogs”.

 

Meet Professor Franklin and a whole galazy of other thought provoking speakers including NASA doc Micheal Barrett at the next Extreme Medicine Conference in London

http://www.extrememedicineexpo.com/

 

(c) The Independant http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/scientists-say-burrowing-frogs-genes-could-help-humanity-voyage-into-space-9576104.html

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Humbling feedback …

Sometimes we are utterly humbled…

imageMatthew Jones posted on Expedition and Wilderness Medicines timeline

‘Hi guys I met another person who has done your Expedition and Wilderness Medicine Course, on the roadside, last night and I would like to pass my thanks on to your team. Last night I was asked to attend a Technician crew as Paramedic backup for a traumatic head injury, When I arrived the crew had done an amazing job already and were being assisted by a calm, knowledgeable Nurse who appeared completely at ease in this unusual environment for her. I have done a number of jobs where Nurses have stopped to help and I think it is safe to say they are often as uncomfortable in my environment as I would be trying to work in theirs.

As the job progressed and the patient became more unwell and required more interventions she was part of the team and worked perfectly alongside myself, my pre-hospital colleagues, HEMS and the police. Once we had her packaged and en route to hospital I asked her about her trauma & pre-hospital training (she usually works on an acute medical admission ward). The answer was of course “I did a course on expedition medicine” I asked a few names of the tutors, Sean, Caroline, Piers et al were names we both knew. So thanks to the Nurse, I will find you and make sure this is recognised. But also thanks to Team Expedition Medicine. Last night, by proxy, you were involved in saving a young life, which I think is pretty damn awesome!” Matthew Jones posted on Expedition and Wilderness Medicine’s timeline “Hi guys I met another person who has done your Expedition and Wilderness Medicine Course, on the roadside, last night and I would like to pass my thanks on to your team. Last night I was asked to attend a Technician crew as Paramedic backup for a traumatic head injury.

When I arrived the crew had done an amazing job already and were being assisted by a calm, knowledgeable Nurse who appeared completely at ease in this unusual environment for her. I have done a number of jobs where Nurses have stopped to help and I think it is safe to say they are often as uncomfortable in my environment as I would be trying to work in theirs. As the job progressed and the patient became more unwell and required more interventions she was part of the team and worked perfectly alongside myself, my pre-hospital colleagues, HEMS and the police. Once we had her packaged and en route to hospital I asked her about her trauma & pre-hospital training (she usually works on an acute medical admission ward). The answer was of course “I did a course on expedition medicine” I asked a few names of the tutors, Sean, Caroline, Piers et al were names we both knew.

So thanks to the Nurse, I will find you and make sure this is recognised. But also thanks to Team Expedition Medicine.

Last night, by proxy, you were involved in saving a young life, which I think is pretty dam awesome!!!!’

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Extreme Medicine Conference Bursary

Conference Bursary – Exnme Medicine Conference 8-11th November 2014 Royal Society of Medicine, London

‘David Weil Extreme Medicine Award’ (DWEMA)

The ‘David Weil Extreme Medicine Award’ (DWEMA) and is by invitation only however, noninations of worthy candidates are welcome for the 2014 Extreme Medicine Conference which will take place at the Royal Society of Medicine in London 26 – 29 October 2014.

To nominate please contact Mark Hannaford, Managing Director, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine; admin@expedition-medicine.com

The sponsorship scheme was set up to enable worthy medical candidates, who otherwise might not be able to afford, to attend the conference.  The learnings would then be applied to medicine provided in extreme, front line, disaster & relief environments and in turn relieve suffering and advance medical care in the situations where typically treatment would be laking. The award also serves to promote new qualified individuals who show great promise in the area of disastor, humantarian and remote medicine.

Successful applicants must have demonstrated considerable commitment to the field of humanitarian or disaster medicine and be registered as a medical professional, must be free for the entire conference and will be expected to prepare a post conference report.   Applications are welcome from medics of all nationalities.

David is a Hong Kong/ London based entrepreneur who is passionate about using his resources to make positive social change and has supported EWM for a number of years and he has offered to cover the following expenses;

  • Travel & expenses from your home to the conference and return
  • Food & Accommodation whilst at the conference
  • Free entry to both the Pre Conference workshop running on the preceding weekend and the Conference itself
  • Winners  have the right to call yourself joint-winner of the 2013 David Weil Extreme Medicine Award to use the conference logos and branding in an appropriate manner

Sir Ranulph FiennesThe Conference

 

 

 

 

 

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EWM’s Wild Medicine Course Changed our Lives

We know that education opens doors and as the EWM crew are both interested and a bit nosey, we love to hear what our alumni get up to after attending our courses.  Naturally then, we were delighted to hear from Ian P, who told us he and his wife loved the  2013 Wild Medicine course so much, they’re busy packing up in the UK and moving to Namibia…

Not many things you can say that change your life!  Attending the Wild Medicine course was one of those events.  Amazing set of people and a fantastic opportunity to learn about conservation and desert medicine.  

The kind of odd things we learnt…
- Take blood from a cheetah,
- Learn about (and touch – optional) many poisonous snakes,
- Sleep in a desert,  walk 14km through a dry river canyon,
- What are the problem animals with Rabies? (A: Kudu),
- How can carnivores live outside conservation areas & not get killed by farmers &
villagers?

- How to build a vineyard in a desert … what?!.. 

And the thing that changed our lives? Meet the Bushmen and see their need for healthcare!  My wife and I are volunteering at Naankuse to run the Bushmen medical services. The real thing we learned? There are many people out there that can benefit from our skills … 

Oh and by the way Namibia is amazing you get to see loads … but you can also get a 4×4 and do a week or so trip before the course.

 

Other courses of interest:
Remote Medicine
Extreme Medicine Conference

This years Wild Medicine Course

 

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Extreme Medicine 2013 – to the delegates

Extreme Medicine 2013

We hope that you enjoyed our inaugural conference in the US as much as we did! What an amazing week topped off by the Red Sox winning the World Series (some of us might have questioned how it can be a world series when there aren’t any international teams but that’s just us!!)

Below you will find a link to an online survey where you can feed back to, we would really appreciate it if you could take the time to let know your views and its essential if you want to claim CME and FAWM points for the conference and pre conference workshop

Extreme Medicine ’14

26-29 October 2014

Next years location is still a bit up in the air …London … Abu Dhabi … London but the dates are confirmed so make sure your free!

Details for be confirmed by December 2013
We have a new website address, please make sure you bookmark it!

www.extrememedicineexpo.com 

New Course Launch

Remote Medicine and Glacier Safety Skills led by Dr Luanne Freer 10 CME

01 September 2014 to 06 September 2014
Join us on a 6 day CME accredited Wilderness Medicine and Glacier Safety Skills course set in stunning southern Iceland led by Dr Luanne Freer.

Dr Freer is the Medical Director of Yellowstone National Park, ex President of the Wilderness Medical Society and subject of the documentary ‘Everest ER’ which features her work running the field hospital at Everest Base Camp

Find out more here…

Our charities

If you would like to stay in contact with Child in Hand, Extreme Medicine’s 2013 charity partner, please find their website here

Everest ER, beneficiary of income from theEWM Mountain Medicine course in Nepaleach year, can be found here…

What are our team up to?

Dr Paul Auerbach is leading our Antarctic Wilderness Medicine Conference aboard the National Geographic Explorer in 2014 and we invite you to join him on what promises to be an amazing experience - click here to find to find out more

If you are free in couple of weeks to travel to Galapagos you be able to hear from the inspiring EverestER founder Dr Luanne Freer as she is leading our conference aboard the National Geographic Endeavour for a trip departing the 28 November, its last minute but if you are free read more here…  might you also be tempted by a remote medicine and glacier skills course in Iceland?? See here for more…

Dr Amy Hughes EWM’s medical director is in the Philippines leading the UK’s national response to the tragedy unfolding there and also our next Expedition Medicine course in England -find out more here…

Conference Book Deal

Paul Auerbachs iconic book ‘Wilderness Medicine’ is offered to you at a conference only discount just use this code at your point of purchase fromElsevier at the website here…

‘Quickly and decisively manage any medical encountered in the great outdoors! Proven, practical guidance for effectively diagnosing and treating the full range of emergencies and health encountered in the wilderness makes this an indispensable resource for rescuers, first responders,and treating physicians!’

Use promotional code DM53394 to SAVE 10% on this title atus.elsevierhealth.com

Please let us know how we did and complete to claim you CME points…

Click here to take survey

Please make sure you make it to the bottom of the survey as there are a couple of questions you need to answer.

Thank you for reading our news!

If you require any further information on any of our courses or how you can get invovled please contact us.

Email admin@expeditionmedicine.co.uk or
Call us on +44 (0)1234 766778

 

 

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Amazing Pre conference workshop for Extreme Medicine 2012

Pre confer workshop for Extreme Medicine 2013 from Expedition & Wilderness Medicine on Vimeo.

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