Archive for the ‘Kathmandu’ Category

Team Rubicon: Short term position in Nepal

TeamRubiconLogoOur lovely friends at Team Rubicon urgently require a volunteer medic to join them in Nepal, 19 March – 2 April.  Flights & expenses covered.  Please email a brief introduction and medical CV to tim.edwards@teamrubiconuk.org .  Here’s the detail:

Calling all medics! There is a fantastic opportunity to be part of a volunteer team going to Nepal in March to rebuild a school destroyed in the earthquake. Team Rubicon UK provides disaster relief to those affected by natural disasters, be they domestic or international. By pairing the skills and experiences of military veterans with first responders, medical professionals, and technology solutions, Team Rubicon aims to provide the greatest service and impact possible.

After last year’s earthquake Team Rubicon sent teams into Nepal to help with the immediate aftermath and hundreds of thousands of people were helped. Almost a year on there are still thousands of Nepalis who still need help with basic services. The team is complete except for one important member – a medic. Due to the remote nature of the deployment it is vital that they take someone suitably qualified to deal with trauma, life support, and normal medical problems. The team is 16 strong with basic first aid qualifications but what they really need is a paramedic or other suitably qualified person to deploy with them.

Team RubiconThe trip is from the 19 March until 2 April (flights dependent within a day). The deployment is unpaid but all flights and expenses are covered.If you are interested in being involved in what will be a fantastic opportunity please email a brief introduction and medical CV to tim.edwards@teamrubiconuk.org .

As time is short Team Rubicon have asked that only those who are confident that they can deploy get in contact.  Thanks.

 

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Mountain Medicine

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The latest news, views and opportunities from EWM Towers

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

To take advantage of the World Extreme Medicine Expo early bird offer use discount code WEMEEARLYBIRD30 at the checkout.

Response to the Paris attacks

The medical response to multisite terrorist attacks in Paris reviews the coordinated effort from the emergency services and Assistance
Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP) .
The article offers the perspective of an Emergency Physician, Anaesthesiologist and a Trauma Surgeon, before offering a conclusion.

It’s clear no matter what the plan, it’s the people; doctors, nurses, emergency services, administrators, volunteers and many others, that enable a successful response.
View the FULL ARTICLE on the Lancet’s website.

Jobs and opportunities

The European Space Agency is once again looking for a doctor to join them for a year of research and experiments at the Concordia research station in Antarctica.
Click HERE to see the post on the ESA website.

Luangwa Safari Association Medical Fund need a doctor for 3-6 months to provide care for staff and guest in addition to providing care at Kakumbi Rural Health Centre.
Check out the full details HERE and to read a previous doctor’s blog written during her time in the role click HERE

Course pick

Mountain Medicine 2016 following another extremely successful course in Nepal trekking to Kala Patthar and Everest Base Camp.
The first piece of feedback we received told us “this was the most amazing trip I have been on” and it is comments like these we aim for and pride ourselves on.
Pre-hospital Trauma Workshops will continue throughout 2016. We focus on initial care around head injuries, chest injuries, traumatic cardiac arrest, blast and ballistic injuries. We’ll also touch on crew resource management and effective leadership on scene in the single and multi casualty scenarios.

“We treat athletes like NASA treats astronauts”.

Last month saw the launch of Vollebak, a new brand that aims to tackle the fundamental issues faced by extreme sports people.

Having lived through the highs and lows that come with racing and training in the world’s toughest environments, founders and adventure athletes Steve and Nick Tidball, started working on products and experiments to help athletes relax and survive.
Click HERE to find out more.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

World Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo

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Acute mountain sickness – a review by Dr Sean Hudson

Management of AMS

Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Comparison of Acetazolamide Versus Ibuprofen for Prophylaxis Against High Altitude Headache: The Headache Evaluation at Altitude Trial (HEAT)

High altitude headache (HAH) is the most common neurological complaint at altitude and the defining component of acute mountain sickness (AMS). However, there is a paucity of literature concerning its prevention. The researchers sought to compare the effectiveness of ibuprofen and acetazolamide for the prevention of HAH.

Three hundred forty-three healthy western trekkers were recruited at altitudes of 4280 m and 4358 m and assigned to receive ibuprofen 600 mg, acetazolamide 85 mg, or placebo 3 times daily before continued ascent to 4928 m. Outcome measures included headache incidence and severity, AMS incidence and severity on the Lake Louise AMS Questionnaire (LLQ), and visual analog scale (VAS).

Two hundred sixty-five of 343 subjects completed the trial. HAH incidence was similar when treated with acetazolamide (27.1%) or ibuprofen (27.5%; P = .95), and both agents were significantly more effective than placebo (45.3%; P = .01). AMS incidence was similar when treated with acetazolamide (18.8%) or ibuprofen (13.7%; P = .34), and both agents were significantly more effective than placebo (28.6%; P = .03). In fully compliant participants, moderate or severe headache incidence was similar when treated with acetazolamide (3.8%) or ibuprofen (4.7%; P = .79), and both agents were significantly more effective than placebo (13.5%; P = .03).

Fascinatingly the authors demonstrated that Ibuprofen and acetazolamide are similarly effective in preventing HAH. This adds another medication to the useful arsenal to use in the treatment of AMS and in particular is especially useful when you have a patient who can’t take acetazolamide (diabetics or sulphur allergies) .

Learn more about Altitude Medicine by joining Expedition and Wilderness Medicine’s CME accredited Mountain Medicine course in Nepal headed up by Everest ER founder Dr Luanne Freer

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Mountain Medicine course to Everest Base Camp approved for 22.5 CME

Expedition Medicines Mountain Medicine course in along the Everest Base Camp Trail in Nepal led by expedition doctor’s Luanne Freer and Amy Hughes and Everest Expedition Leader Nick Arding OBE has been formally accredited by the Wilderness Medical Society for 22.5 CME points. 

Spaces are very limited 

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Nick Arding OBE joins as part of the Nepal Mountain Medicine Team

Nick Arding will be joining Expedition Medicines Mountain Medicine course on the Everest Base Camp Trail along with Dr’s Luanne Freer of Everest ER and Amy Hughes of Kent HEM’s service in October on what promises to be an amazing CME accredited course*.

Nick served as an officer in the Royal Marines for 22 years, travelling and climbing widely during that time. In ‘92 he took part in the British Annapurna 2 Expedition and in ‘93 led his own trip to climb the West Buttress of Mt McKinley in Alaska.  He commanded the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines from 2003 to 2005.

In 2003 Nick led a Royal Navy expedition to climb Everest by its North Ridge; not only did they climb the mountain but his team were instrumental in rescuing two other climbers from above 8000m, the highest mountain rescue on record and for which he was awarded the Royal Humane Society Bronze Medal. 

A keen rock climber and mountaineer since his teens, Nick holds the Mountaineering Instructor (MI)  and International Mountain Leader (MIA) awards.He left the Royal Marines in 2005 to qualify as a teacher and now works as a leadership coach and management consultant. He has led civilian teams to Mongolia, Nepal and the Alps, and when not working can usually be found on a rock face or in a sea kayak!  In 2009 Nick took a team of friends to the Rolwaling Valley in Nepal to attempt an unclimbed mountain called Cheki-go. He has close links with this region, having raised funds to sponsor local Sherpas, three of whom have been able to visit the UK to improve their climbing skills and English language.

*accredited by the Wilderness Medical Society

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