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Course accreditation update

Given our new academic focus, we have chosen not to renew our accreditation with the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS), therefore we  are no longer able to offer CME through the WMS for our courses.

CME is generally considered to be educational content that is appropriate for the speciality that a doctor works in. Expedition and wilderness medicine is not part of any core medical specialty programme and as such does not fit any conventional CME programmes except the WMS. Historically, we chose the WMS to accredit our courses to provide clients with an opportunity to claim CME/ CPD credits. Very recently we learned that the WMS had changed their internal processes which meant that in addition to us re-applying for course accreditation, our faculty would also need to have their FAWM in order to teach on our courses. We recruit our staff based on their academic qualifications along with their skills, experience and research that has contributed to the world’s understanding of expedition medicine. As such, we do not consider it necessary for them to also have their FAWM.

This coincides with the considerable amount of effort we’re applying to develop our Extreme Medicine post-graduate and Masters programme. This is work undertaken in collaboration with the University of Exeter, one of the top 100 universities in the world, and will result in a universally recognised academically consistent qualification, which holds more weight. This introduces a competency based programme across our entire course portfolio. Whether you’ll be part of the post-graduate programme or you’re choosing to take part on one of our stand alone courses, all content will be subject to the same review and approvals process by the University.

Right now, you’re a client who is at a bridging point before the post-graduate programme is fully established. At the end of the course you’re scheduled to attend, we will give you a certificate of attendance and a list of competences / learning outcome which you can self-assess against your portfolios or CPD learning logs

We continue to strive for best practice within the expedition medicine world and think that courses based on competences offer a better outcome for our clients continued professional development and for the people ultimately under your care.

If you have any questions please do get in touch with us and we’ll be happy to discuss these with you.

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The latest news, views and opportunities from EWM Towers

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

To take advantage of the World Extreme Medicine Expo early bird offer use discount code WEMEEARLYBIRD30 at the checkout.

Response to the Paris attacks

The medical response to multisite terrorist attacks in Paris reviews the coordinated effort from the emergency services and Assistance
Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP) .
The article offers the perspective of an Emergency Physician, Anaesthesiologist and a Trauma Surgeon, before offering a conclusion.

It’s clear no matter what the plan, it’s the people; doctors, nurses, emergency services, administrators, volunteers and many others, that enable a successful response.
View the FULL ARTICLE on the Lancet’s website.

Jobs and opportunities

The European Space Agency is once again looking for a doctor to join them for a year of research and experiments at the Concordia research station in Antarctica.
Click HERE to see the post on the ESA website.

Luangwa Safari Association Medical Fund need a doctor for 3-6 months to provide care for staff and guest in addition to providing care at Kakumbi Rural Health Centre.
Check out the full details HERE and to read a previous doctor’s blog written during her time in the role click HERE

Course pick

Mountain Medicine 2016 following another extremely successful course in Nepal trekking to Kala Patthar and Everest Base Camp.
The first piece of feedback we received told us “this was the most amazing trip I have been on” and it is comments like these we aim for and pride ourselves on.
Pre-hospital Trauma Workshops will continue throughout 2016. We focus on initial care around head injuries, chest injuries, traumatic cardiac arrest, blast and ballistic injuries. We’ll also touch on crew resource management and effective leadership on scene in the single and multi casualty scenarios.

“We treat athletes like NASA treats astronauts”.

Last month saw the launch of Vollebak, a new brand that aims to tackle the fundamental issues faced by extreme sports people.

Having lived through the highs and lows that come with racing and training in the world’s toughest environments, founders and adventure athletes Steve and Nick Tidball, started working on products and experiments to help athletes relax and survive.
Click HERE to find out more.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

World Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo

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Take a look at our latest newsletter to find out more about the amazingly adventurous Dr Andrew Peacock

 

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

Have you booked your place for Dartmoor ’15? We’ll host our next Expedition & Wilderness Medicine course, 16 – 19 November and have new additional content on offer. Places are filling up fast, so if you’re keen to kick-start your Expedition Medicine career join us North Devon.

What’s a ‘traditional’ medicine career?

Dr Andrew Peacock works with us as a faculty member and also as Medical Director for Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Australia. Andrew recently spoke with RedBull.com about his adventurous career, giving an insight into how he balances a passion for outdoor pursuits and medicine. Click HERE to learn what makes the most adventurous of medics tick.

Poster competition

We’re super pleased with our new look Extreme Medicine Conference website. We’ve just added a page for our poster competition.
We’ve made it nice and easy for you to register and submit your abstract. Click HERE to be taken straight to the poster page.

Blogging for all the right reasons.

According to Uncharted Expeditions, “PTSD is a growing epidemic and the dialogue needs to continue for others to step out of the silence and get help”. In this blog one paramedic is finding peace in the mountains and she’s sharing her experiences.
This is a frank and brave blog, but one that is of great value to the writer and will hopefully help many others along the way. THIS LINK will take you straight there.

Antarctic job opportunity

The University of Texas Medical Branch is looking for an Emergency or Family Medicine physician with acute care experience to join them at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.
You must have US citizenship, a US medical license and a love for dark snowy places.
The clinical load will is light, but the opportunity to work in this remote location should appeal to physicians interested in extreme and altitude medicine. This role provides a number of rare experiences like a view of the Aurora Australis and Milky Way from a perspective few others are fortunate experience.
Visit our jobs page HERE for more information and the relevant application contact details.

Kili’ opportunity

Action Challenge are looking for a medic to join their Kilimanjaro expedition, August 20 – 30. This expedition will follow the Lemosho route. The medic must be a fully qualified doctor – altitude experience and expedition medicine course attendance is preferred, but not essential and expenses for the trip will be covered.
If you’re looking for an adventure taking you up the world’s highest free standing mountain and are keen to tick off one of the Seven Summits, this could be right up your street.
For more information, take a look at the job advert HERE or to contact Action Challenge direct, call James Holland on +44 (0)20 7609 6695.

It’s your time to shine

If you have a story to share or know we want to hear from you. Blogs, vlogs interviews etc. are all welcomed, click HERE to share your experiences.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

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The view from EWM towers is a very exciting one and here’s why.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

News and updates

The view from EWM towers is a very exciting one and here’s why.

Moving forward

We’re delighted to announce the development of a new postgraduate education programme in Expedition, Wilderness and Extreme Medicine where students will work towards a Certificate, Diploma and MSc.
Building on over a decade of successful evolving courses to highlight Expedition Medicine as a career option, we feel that now is the right time to take a step forward and offer a formal postgraduate programme that matches the increasing levels of clinical governance in this field. We think you’ll all agree that this is really exciting for us at EWM, but also for medics out there who wish to formalise the learning and skills they have picked up in this exciting field of medicine.
If you’re interested and would like to hear more news as we announce it, be sure to sign up to our postgraduate mailing list HERE.

Next stop…
..New Zealand.

To be a little more precise we’ll be off to the beautiful Southern Alps for our ever popular Polar Medicine course. There are only a few spaces left so click HEREif you’re thinking of joining us.

Course News

We listen to our delegates and as part of our improvement strategy extended our next UK based course, to four full days. The course, which will be held in Dartmoor, will allow time for additional learning, a little more free time and greater networking opportunities. For more information visit our Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Dartmoor page HERE.

Interns/Electives

Great news for our readership who approach us about intern posts or electives. We are re-establishing our EWMi programme to accept an intern on each of our UK based courses. For more information on the application process click HERE.
If you have any questions about electives we’d recommend you take a look at what our great friends at Adventure Medic are doing. It’s a fantastic resource which contains accounts from returning medics, but check out their resources section for elective opportunities!

We want to hear from you

Your experiences: We love a good blog (or vlog) that shares your experiences with the wider world. EWM was born out of adventure and although we’re passionate about delivering high quality training, adventure is still in our soul and we enjoy reading your tales and admiring your photos.

Your photos: Photography is another passion of ours, bridging languages, sharing culture and stirring the deepest emotions. If you have a great snap you’d like to see appear in our newsletter then get in touch HERE 
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Conservation Research Organisation Requires Medics

Man--and-lemur Operation Wallacea undertakes biodiversity monitoring and conservation research expeditions in countries across the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. We need medics urgently for 2-8week contracts on a variety of expeditions including: Madagascar, Honduras and Mexico.

Many of our projects are in developing countries where medical facilities are poor, and we are generally based in remote areas, so we rely on the help of volunteer medics to join our teams and provide medical support for the staff and students on site.  Accommodation, meals and a travel bursary (which varies in size depending on how long you are available for) will be provided.

Being a medic on expedition generally involves giving health and safety briefings to incoming participants, providing a daily clinic session and being available for emergencies at other times.

You are free to join the research projects for most of the time, as long as you remain within a reasonable distance of the camp at which you are based so it is a great opportunity to get out and involved in research and conservation in some truly amazing locations.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If this sounds like it may be of interest and you are free from two to eight weeks between June and August then please send a copy of your resume to Caroline Acton at caroline.acton@opwall.com

 

Medical links of interest

Extreme Medicine Conference

Pre-Hospital Care Workshop with London Air Ambulance

Sir Ranulph Fiennes & Extreme Medicine

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EWM’s Wild Medicine Course Changed our Lives

We know that education opens doors and as the EWM crew are both interested and a bit nosey, we love to hear what our alumni get up to after attending our courses.  Naturally then, we were delighted to hear from Ian P, who told us he and his wife loved the  2013 Wild Medicine course so much, they’re busy packing up in the UK and moving to Namibia…

Not many things you can say that change your life!  Attending the Wild Medicine course was one of those events.  Amazing set of people and a fantastic opportunity to learn about conservation and desert medicine.  

The kind of odd things we learnt…
– Take blood from a cheetah,
– Learn about (and touch – optional) many poisonous snakes,
– Sleep in a desert,  walk 14km through a dry river canyon,
– What are the problem animals with Rabies? (A: Kudu),
– How can carnivores live outside conservation areas & not get killed by farmers &
villagers?

– How to build a vineyard in a desert … what?!.. 

And the thing that changed our lives? Meet the Bushmen and see their need for healthcare!  My wife and I are volunteering at Naankuse to run the Bushmen medical services. The real thing we learned? There are many people out there that can benefit from our skills … 

Oh and by the way Namibia is amazing you get to see loads … but you can also get a 4×4 and do a week or so trip before the course.

 

Other courses of interest:
Remote Medicine
Extreme Medicine Conference

This years Wild Medicine Course

 

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Conservation Course in Namibia accredited for CME

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine’s new Conservation Medicine course in Namibia has been accredited for 16.5 CME

Located at the stunning N/a’ankuse Lodge and Wildlife Sanctuary only 42kms east of Windhoek is Expedition & Wilderness Medicine’s new Conservation Medicine Course. This truly unique lodge is set amidst a natural savannah, with riverine vegetation, lush grass plains and magnificent mountain views, and offers a malaria free Wild Medicine course.

The main objective of the course is to educate attendees as to how we can integrate the diagnostic and problem solving skills of both human and animal health professionals with the knowledge of conservation professionals. Ultimately this should help all concerned to better manage the environment and biodiversity to the benefit of all the inhabitants of our beautiful planet.

The emerging interdisciplinary field of conservation medicine, which integrates human and veterinary medicine and environmental sciences, is largely concerned with  zoonose. At the present time there is very little sharing knowledge in both an academic and practical session and this course serves to address this significant gap.

To book your place

 

Of interest – Desert & Wilderness Medicinal Training Course

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Dr Roger Alcock feedback on Keswick SAR exercise

Dr Roger Alcock, lead medic on this Septembers Keswick based Expedition & Wilderness Medicine course talk about the high calibre of medics on the search & rescue scenerio run on the hills about the EWM training base

The aim of the Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Course is to provide aspiring and experienced expedition doctors, nurses, paramedics and advanced medics with the skills and practical knowledge to become valuable members of an expedition medical team.

The gold standard and highly acclaimed course based in Keswick and Plas y Brenin in Wales

Of interest

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Expedition Medicine’s UK Course welcomes their University Liaison

Dr Nick Knight - Expedition Medicine Facualty

Dr Nick Knight - Expedition Medicine University Liaison (c) Mark Hannaford FRGS

Expedition Medicine’s UK Course Welcomes their University Liaison

With the sunshine out and the rasping sounds of the Search and Rescue Teams over the two-way radios out on the Cumbria hills – you would have been easily mistaken in thinking you were in the middle of a real emergency. In fact, it was the final Search and Rescue exercise (with CASEVAC) of a fantastic 4 day Expedition Medicine Course in Keswick in Cumbria.

As the University Liaison for Expedition Medicine, it was the first course that I attended as a new member of the ‘EM faculty’ – and what a fantastic experience it was. Not only did I get to absorb the electric atmosphere of the 60+ delegates there alongside the seasoned expedition medics leading the course but it gave me ample opportunity to see how such courses can align themselves with my role as University Liaison and to stimulate a few more ideas.

(more…)

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Treatment of cholera in active malaria zone

The treatment of cholera in an active malaria zone is a difficult matter.  This is especially true with lessons being learned in Haiti and their recent cholera outbreak.  I am specifically referring to the combination of Chloroquine (antimalarial) and the antibiotic class Macrolides (used in treatment of cholera).  A post that I made back in 2009 has new recent relevance and I wanted to repost that here:

Azithromycin, Chloroquine and Arrythmias:

Travel medicine frequently uses medicines that are taken under special circumstances and for short periods of time, like a trip.  Many travelers carry an antidiarrheal antibiotic on their trip and a common choice is azithromycin.  This can potentially be a problem when they are also traveling in a malaria area and using chloroquine for prevention.  Two very commonly used medicines chloroquine (antimalarial) and azithromycin(macrolide antibiotic used for respiratory infections and diarrhea) both have wonderful safety profiles, individually.  However when taken together, there is discussion of the chance of a heart arrhythmia, specifically prolonging the QT interval.  In fact, my software I use for prescribing cites this as a combination to avoid. 

There are several important articles that can be used to look at this problem and evaluate the risks.  One very good paper looks at medications that prolong this QT interval:

These authors list azithromycin as a “very improbable” medication, although other macrolides are listed as higher risk.  Chloroquine is listed as an “Unknown” medication, with respect to prolongation of QT interval.  This article was based on expert opinions.

This study looked directly at this problem, in animal models.  Their research showed no increase in arrhythmia risk. 

A wonderful article that is actually helping to look at using this drug combination to treat resistant forms of malaria.  More about this combination and treating malaria here.  Their study did show an increase in the QT interval in both groups of those who received chloroquine alone and those who received the combination of chloroquine and azithromycin.  This QT interval increase was maximum on day number three and returned to baseline by the end of the study.

Most of the information I am finding looks reassuring for safely using this combination, in healthy individuals.  Those with a history of arrhythmia should use this combination with caution and discuss this problem with their doctor, before they take these two medicines within a close amount of time.

Contributer: Dr Erik McLaughlin |  www.adventuredoc.net

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