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Course accreditation update

Given our new academic focus, we have chosen not to renew our accreditation with the Wilderness Medical Society (WMS), therefore we  are no longer able to offer CME through the WMS for our courses.

CME is generally considered to be educational content that is appropriate for the speciality that a doctor works in. Expedition and wilderness medicine is not part of any core medical specialty programme and as such does not fit any conventional CME programmes except the WMS. Historically, we chose the WMS to accredit our courses to provide clients with an opportunity to claim CME/ CPD credits. Very recently we learned that the WMS had changed their internal processes which meant that in addition to us re-applying for course accreditation, our faculty would also need to have their FAWM in order to teach on our courses. We recruit our staff based on their academic qualifications along with their skills, experience and research that has contributed to the world’s understanding of expedition medicine. As such, we do not consider it necessary for them to also have their FAWM.

This coincides with the considerable amount of effort we’re applying to develop our Extreme Medicine post-graduate and Masters programme. This is work undertaken in collaboration with the University of Exeter, one of the top 100 universities in the world, and will result in a universally recognised academically consistent qualification, which holds more weight. This introduces a competency based programme across our entire course portfolio. Whether you’ll be part of the post-graduate programme or you’re choosing to take part on one of our stand alone courses, all content will be subject to the same review and approvals process by the University.

Right now, you’re a client who is at a bridging point before the post-graduate programme is fully established. At the end of the course you’re scheduled to attend, we will give you a certificate of attendance and a list of competences / learning outcome which you can self-assess against your portfolios or CPD learning logs

We continue to strive for best practice within the expedition medicine world and think that courses based on competences offer a better outcome for our clients continued professional development and for the people ultimately under your care.

If you have any questions please do get in touch with us and we’ll be happy to discuss these with you.

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The latest news, views and opportunities from EWM Towers

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

To take advantage of the World Extreme Medicine Expo early bird offer use discount code WEMEEARLYBIRD30 at the checkout.

Response to the Paris attacks

The medical response to multisite terrorist attacks in Paris reviews the coordinated effort from the emergency services and Assistance
Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (APHP) .
The article offers the perspective of an Emergency Physician, Anaesthesiologist and a Trauma Surgeon, before offering a conclusion.

It’s clear no matter what the plan, it’s the people; doctors, nurses, emergency services, administrators, volunteers and many others, that enable a successful response.
View the FULL ARTICLE on the Lancet’s website.

Jobs and opportunities

The European Space Agency is once again looking for a doctor to join them for a year of research and experiments at the Concordia research station in Antarctica.
Click HERE to see the post on the ESA website.

Luangwa Safari Association Medical Fund need a doctor for 3-6 months to provide care for staff and guest in addition to providing care at Kakumbi Rural Health Centre.
Check out the full details HERE and to read a previous doctor’s blog written during her time in the role click HERE

Course pick

Mountain Medicine 2016 following another extremely successful course in Nepal trekking to Kala Patthar and Everest Base Camp.
The first piece of feedback we received told us “this was the most amazing trip I have been on” and it is comments like these we aim for and pride ourselves on.
Pre-hospital Trauma Workshops will continue throughout 2016. We focus on initial care around head injuries, chest injuries, traumatic cardiac arrest, blast and ballistic injuries. We’ll also touch on crew resource management and effective leadership on scene in the single and multi casualty scenarios.

“We treat athletes like NASA treats astronauts”.

Last month saw the launch of Vollebak, a new brand that aims to tackle the fundamental issues faced by extreme sports people.

Having lived through the highs and lows that come with racing and training in the world’s toughest environments, founders and adventure athletes Steve and Nick Tidball, started working on products and experiments to help athletes relax and survive.
Click HERE to find out more.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Courses

World Extreme Medicine Conference & Expo

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EWMi – The Clock’s Ticking.

Time’s running out for the EWMi opportunity in Dartmoor

Below is the information from our blog post earlier this year, which will tell you all you need to know to apply for our next intern opportunity!

We are a friendly, easy going, but hard working bunch who are used to long days, little rest and working together to get a job done. We do this with a ready smile and a can do attitude which very much reflects the EWM philosophy. As an intern we’d like you to be slot into our team straight away and be happy to muck in when and wherever we need you.

If you’re interested in joining us as an intern, you will need to make your own way to the course location on the afternoon prior to the course and remain until we are packed away on the final day. You’ll stay in the faculty accommodation and may be required to assist with almost any part of setting up the course; everything from setting up seating, packing med bags, sorting out kit or directing course delegates to specific locations. In return, while with us as, we will make every effort to ensure you are able to attend each lecture and workshop and of course, you’ll get to know our incredible faculty.

The next intern position available, will be for our Expedition & Wilderness Medicine course based in Dartmoor 16-19 November. You’ll need to get yourself to the venue, but we will provide all your home comforts for you.  For all UK course dates click HERE

We welcome applications from the UK and overseas but are not able to reimburse travel expenses.  To submit your application for consideration, please send us:

  • A recent CV with an outdoor image of yourself (we reserve the right to use this image for marketing purposes).
  • Something that tells us about you and your achievements – this can take any form, but use this as your opportunity to sell yourself to us.
  • A covering letter telling us why you would make a good intern – max 300 words.

In return we only ask for your good humour, entertaining company, a course write up to be supplied to us with one month and agreement to make yourself available for a telephone interview post course.

Email your enquiries and submissions to admin@expedition-medicine.com

To ensure you receive our emails make sure you add us to you safe senders list!

Courses of interest

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The view from EWM towers is a very exciting one and here’s why.

Expedition & Wilderness Medicine

News and updates

The view from EWM towers is a very exciting one and here’s why.

Moving forward

We’re delighted to announce the development of a new postgraduate education programme in Expedition, Wilderness and Extreme Medicine where students will work towards a Certificate, Diploma and MSc.
Building on over a decade of successful evolving courses to highlight Expedition Medicine as a career option, we feel that now is the right time to take a step forward and offer a formal postgraduate programme that matches the increasing levels of clinical governance in this field. We think you’ll all agree that this is really exciting for us at EWM, but also for medics out there who wish to formalise the learning and skills they have picked up in this exciting field of medicine.
If you’re interested and would like to hear more news as we announce it, be sure to sign up to our postgraduate mailing list HERE.

Next stop…
..New Zealand.

To be a little more precise we’ll be off to the beautiful Southern Alps for our ever popular Polar Medicine course. There are only a few spaces left so click HEREif you’re thinking of joining us.

Course News

We listen to our delegates and as part of our improvement strategy extended our next UK based course, to four full days. The course, which will be held in Dartmoor, will allow time for additional learning, a little more free time and greater networking opportunities. For more information visit our Expedition & Wilderness Medicine Dartmoor page HERE.

Interns/Electives

Great news for our readership who approach us about intern posts or electives. We are re-establishing our EWMi programme to accept an intern on each of our UK based courses. For more information on the application process click HERE.
If you have any questions about electives we’d recommend you take a look at what our great friends at Adventure Medic are doing. It’s a fantastic resource which contains accounts from returning medics, but check out their resources section for elective opportunities!

We want to hear from you

Your experiences: We love a good blog (or vlog) that shares your experiences with the wider world. EWM was born out of adventure and although we’re passionate about delivering high quality training, adventure is still in our soul and we enjoy reading your tales and admiring your photos.

Your photos: Photography is another passion of ours, bridging languages, sharing culture and stirring the deepest emotions. If you have a great snap you’d like to see appear in our newsletter then get in touch HERE 
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EWM’s Wild Medicine Course Changed our Lives

We know that education opens doors and as the EWM crew are both interested and a bit nosey, we love to hear what our alumni get up to after attending our courses.  Naturally then, we were delighted to hear from Ian P, who told us he and his wife loved the  2013 Wild Medicine course so much, they’re busy packing up in the UK and moving to Namibia…

Not many things you can say that change your life!  Attending the Wild Medicine course was one of those events.  Amazing set of people and a fantastic opportunity to learn about conservation and desert medicine.  

The kind of odd things we learnt…
– Take blood from a cheetah,
– Learn about (and touch – optional) many poisonous snakes,
– Sleep in a desert,  walk 14km through a dry river canyon,
– What are the problem animals with Rabies? (A: Kudu),
– How can carnivores live outside conservation areas & not get killed by farmers &
villagers?

– How to build a vineyard in a desert … what?!.. 

And the thing that changed our lives? Meet the Bushmen and see their need for healthcare!  My wife and I are volunteering at Naankuse to run the Bushmen medical services. The real thing we learned? There are many people out there that can benefit from our skills … 

Oh and by the way Namibia is amazing you get to see loads … but you can also get a 4×4 and do a week or so trip before the course.

 

Other courses of interest:
Remote Medicine
Extreme Medicine Conference

This years Wild Medicine Course

 

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FAWM point approval for Extreme Medicine Conference

The Wilderness Medicine Society has granted the Extreme Medicine Conference 32.25 credits towards the Fellowship of Wilderness Medicine if all 4 days of the conference are attended

wilderness medical societyThe Academy of Wilderness Medicine  is a modular system of adult education that organizes the broad range of information in the discipline of Wilderness Medicine. It delivers them in a professionally packaged, standardized fashion according to modern concepts of medical education using objectives as the basis for learning experiences and outcomes evaluation where appropriate.

The most visible of the Academy’s modular programs, and the one that promises to be the most popular, is the Fellowship program (Fellow of the Academy of Wilderness Medicine TM or FAWM). This initiative offers a means to identify those who have achieved a demanding set of requirements validating their training and experience in Wilderness Medicine for the assurances of patients, clients, and the public at large. Society members enroll in the Academy and, by completing lessons from a pre-established Wilderness Medicine curriculum as well as receiving credit for specefic, indentiable experience; accumulate credit toward becoming a Fellow.

Any current member of the Wilderness Medical Society who successfully completes the requirements will have the distinction of being a registered member of the Academy of Wilderness Medicine and entitled to use the designation Fellow of the Academy of Wilderness Medicine (FAWM) and may reference it on resumes, business cards, and advertisements.

The Academy of Wilderness Medicine

Extreme Medicine Conference

 

 

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Some feedback just makes us smile!

Feedback on our recent Polar Medicine training course in Norway has clearly affected some of the course delegates by creating a need for ‘biggles-speak’…

PapaFoxtrot calling Red Leaders AlphaHotel, AlphaCharlie, DeltaBravo, Bravo and Delta

Congrats on recent Operation Polar Bear

Wizard week

No prangs

Best ever

Location stunning

Bunks and chow excellent 

Red Leaders all SPLENDID

Hope all returned to base safely

Please pass on to all members of Polar Bear as don’t have call signs

Do you read me ?

Over

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Keele Medical School interviews Dr Amy Hughes, Medical Director at Expedition and Wilderness Medicine

Dr Amy Hughes medical career has been far from ordinary and she talks about how she has ended up as medical lead at EWM.

Dr Hughes co-leads with Dr Luanne Freer our CME accredited Mountain Medicine course on the Everest Base Camp trail in Nepal.

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Acute mountain sickness – a review by Dr Sean Hudson

Management of AMS

Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Comparison of Acetazolamide Versus Ibuprofen for Prophylaxis Against High Altitude Headache: The Headache Evaluation at Altitude Trial (HEAT)

High altitude headache (HAH) is the most common neurological complaint at altitude and the defining component of acute mountain sickness (AMS). However, there is a paucity of literature concerning its prevention. The researchers sought to compare the effectiveness of ibuprofen and acetazolamide for the prevention of HAH.

Three hundred forty-three healthy western trekkers were recruited at altitudes of 4280 m and 4358 m and assigned to receive ibuprofen 600 mg, acetazolamide 85 mg, or placebo 3 times daily before continued ascent to 4928 m. Outcome measures included headache incidence and severity, AMS incidence and severity on the Lake Louise AMS Questionnaire (LLQ), and visual analog scale (VAS).

Two hundred sixty-five of 343 subjects completed the trial. HAH incidence was similar when treated with acetazolamide (27.1%) or ibuprofen (27.5%; P = .95), and both agents were significantly more effective than placebo (45.3%; P = .01). AMS incidence was similar when treated with acetazolamide (18.8%) or ibuprofen (13.7%; P = .34), and both agents were significantly more effective than placebo (28.6%; P = .03). In fully compliant participants, moderate or severe headache incidence was similar when treated with acetazolamide (3.8%) or ibuprofen (4.7%; P = .79), and both agents were significantly more effective than placebo (13.5%; P = .03).

Fascinatingly the authors demonstrated that Ibuprofen and acetazolamide are similarly effective in preventing HAH. This adds another medication to the useful arsenal to use in the treatment of AMS and in particular is especially useful when you have a patient who can’t take acetazolamide (diabetics or sulphur allergies) .

Learn more about Altitude Medicine by joining Expedition and Wilderness Medicine’s CME accredited Mountain Medicine course in Nepal headed up by Everest ER founder Dr Luanne Freer

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Wilderness Medical Society approves Desert Medicine course in Namibia for 20.5 CME

Feedback from delegates in our unique Desert Medicine medical training course in Namibia is feedback enough but the Wilderness Medical Society has also awarded it 20.5 CME points.

‘I had a fantastic time and feel like I learnt a lot. I will definitely be signing up for more courses and recommending the courses to people I know!’    Desert course participant.

Developed for medical professionals or advanced medics working in hot or arid climates. The Desert Medicine Course aims to introduce participants to the skills required to be a valuable member of a desert expeditionary team, and to care for and treat injuries and illness likely to occur in this fascinating environment.

Our Desert Medicine Course is based in Damaraland, an area bounded to the south by the spectacular Namib Desert, to the east by the Kalahari, Ovamboland to the North and the world famous Skeleton Coast to the west. Located near the famous Doros Crater, a massive volcanic crater formed over 140 million years ago. Our training area is a stunning region,  remote from civilisation, inhabited by an array of desert adapted flora and fauna and with some of the most remarkable night skies in the world. As a result of the recent changes in wildlife management in Namibia, the Doros Crater has been chosen as the region in which the endangered white rhinos are being released. It is a very exciting location inhabited by elephants, hyena, giraffe, rhinos, cheetahs and occasionally lions. It is almost unique in Namibia and for this reason we have endeavoured and been allowed to gain access to this virtually uninhabited area. Its the perfect location for our desert course. 

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